Sempervivum

July 30, 2009 at 10:38 pm | Posted in Plants, Sempervivum | Leave a comment
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Hens and chicks, as they’re commonly known,

are drought tolerant, winter hardy, slow spreading

and beautiful additions to the landscape.  Used as

an accent, planted in a rock wall, grouped in a large

container, the give the garden a tropical feel because

of their resemblance to Echeveria and other tender

succulent plants.  They’re not tender at all, in any

sense of the word.  The only thing that can kill

a Sempervivum is prolonged wet conditions.  Their

preferred spot will be dry, well drained soil mixed

with some small gravel and mulched with stones.

Shipped in the dry, they will possibly be shriveled

when they first arrive.  Pot them into a well drained

soil, water once, then put them on ignore for at

least a week.  Soon you will see them perk up and

become the jewels in your garden.  They can also

be planted right into the landscape, however, be

cautious with the small ones, as they can be

dislodged or covered up.  I prefer to pot them into

4″ pots until they root, then move them to their

final spot.

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It’s Thyme to grow…

February 15, 2009 at 10:44 pm | Posted in Plants, Thyme | Leave a comment
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Grow Thyme for groundcovering in your land-

scape.  Use any of the low growing varieties

that reach a maximum size of 1″ tall.  Most have

pink, mauve, purple or white blooms which

attract many native bees and wasps.  Don’t worry,

most hornets and aggressive wasps seem immune

to the attraction of the tiny blooms with lots

of nectar.  Most of the native bees and wasps

are solitary, living singly or in very small groups,

not in a huge hive.  Many of them are very important

as pollinators for many of our food crops, and most

importantly, they will fly even in cool or wet weather

which will ground the ordinary honey bee.  Use Thyme

planted among pavers or as a lawn alternative, or

draping down a rocky bank or slope.  Rockeries

will provide the perfect setting for Thyme, dry and well-

drained, sunny and with ample room for roots to run.

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